Justin Timberlake’s New Album: 5 Fast Facts

Justin Timberlake has been vocal about working on a new record. He was recently nominated for an Academy Award for his original song “Can’t Stop the Feeling!” from the Trolls Soundtrack, and just scored his first film,” The Book of Love.” Timberlake celebrates his 36th birthday on January 31st.

Design and the future of the music industry

My hypertalented friend Lawrence Azerrad, who is designing the Voyager Golden Record: 40th Anniversary Edition and has created packaging for Wilco, Esperanza Spalding, Silversun Pickups, and many other artists (images below), is leading a new effort to explore and cultivate the historical link between design and music. It a fantastic new initiative within the AIGA, the professional associate for design, that will begin with a rich Web site, workshops, and educational programs. Beautiful album artwork and package design isn’t the past of the music-listening experience. Rather it’s essential to its future. From AIGA:

Azerrad says designers need to help engender transitional thinking: design can help the music industry, and the music industry can help designers. But for him, the crux of the matter seems to be in helping people engage with music in a way that can—without exaggeration—change lives. Something tactile may have been lost, but music today still moves us and frames the world and our cultural experiences. “The way we’re engaging with music now is very passive,” he says. “Streaming allows you to listen to any song any time, but we may be listening to it more as background music. The deeper, more life-marking changes happen in a more narrow spectrum. You still have hardcore fans, your Taylor Swift freaks or whatever, but music is now what you listen to while you’re driving or working out.

“Music has always been a key way to mark critical moments, like when you fall in love or lose a loved one. It has the ability to raise the spirit and the soul, that’s why music is a key part of religion and storytelling or ethnic heritage, wherever you’re from. It’s a critical part of defining the human experience, but it’s important we address this now because we’re seeing this atrophy of this part of our culture visually and culturally. If you think about the impact of Bowie and Aladdin Sane, it shaped ideas around queer identity: it mattered to people’s lives. When music is a more passive background experience, people are missing out. There’s less impact and a loss of that emotional resonance.”

The Design + Music Industries are BFFs—They Just Don’t Know it Yet(AIGA)

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Grammys 2017: The Complete Winners List (Updating Live)

James Corden is getting his first crack at emceeing Music’s Biggest Night, guiding all 84 gold gramophones towards their new owners.

From now through 11:30 p.m. ET, his CBS network will be a mix of comedy, singing, dancing, tears of joy, tears of sadness (during the In Memoriam segment), and, knowing Hollywood, probably a number of political statements. TheWrap will be all over the whole broadcast, updating the below list of nominees with winners in real-time.

Let’s be honest, though, the main question everyone really wants answered is “Adele or Beyonce?” Or could it be possible that a third-party comes and ruins their party?

Also Read: Grammys 2017: Red Carpet Arrivals (Photos)

We’ve already got a number of pre-show winners — here are some of those, along with all the other nominees:

Best New Artist
Kelsea Ballerini
The Chainsmokers
Chance The Rapper *WINNER
Maren Morris
Anderson .Paak

Best Pop Vocal Album
25 — Adele *WINNER

Purpose — Justin Bieber
Dangerous Woman — Ariana Grande
Confident — Demi Lovato
This Is Acting — Sia

Best Rock Album
California — Blink-182
Tell Me I’m Pretty — Cage The Elephant *WINNER
Magma — Gojira
Death Of A Bachelor — Panic! At The Disco
Weezer — Weezer

Also Read: Joy Villa Wears a ‘Make America Great Again’ Dress to the Grammys (Photo)

Best Rap Performance
“No Problem” — Chance The Rapper Featuring Lil Wayne & 2 Chainz *WINNER

“Panda” -Desiigner
“Pop Style” — Drake Featuring The Throne
“All The Way Up” — Fat Joe & Remy Ma Featuring French Montana & Infared
“That Part” — ScHoolboy Q Featuring Kanye West

Best Jazz Vocal Album
Sound Of Red — René Marie
Upward Spiral — Branford Marsalis Quartet With Special Guest Kurt Elling
Take Me To The Alley — Gregory Porter *WINNER
Harlem On My Mind — Catherine Russell
The Sting Variations — The Tierney Sutton Band

Best Gospel Album
Listen -Tim Bowman Jr.
Fill This House — Shirley Caesar
A Worshipper’s Heart [Live] -Todd Dulaney
Losing My Religion — Kirk Franklin *WINNER
Demonstrate [Live] -William Murphy

Also Read: Al Jarreau, Jazz Singer, Dies at 76

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album
Poets & Saints — All Sons & Daughters
American Prodigal — Crowder
Be One — Natalie Grant
Youth Revival [Live] — Hillsong Young & Free
Love Remains — Hillary Scott & The Scott Family *WINNER

Best American Roots Performance
“Ain’t No Man” — The Avett Brothers
“Mother’s Children Have A Hard Time” — Blind Boys Of Alabama
“Factory Girl” — Rhiannon Giddens
“House Of Mercy” — Sarah Jarosz *WINNER
“Wreck You” — Lori McKenna

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling)
The Girl With The Lower Back Tattoo — Amy Schumer
In Such Good Company: Eleven Years Of Laughter, Mayhem, And Fun In The Sandbox — Carol Burnett *WINNER
M Train — Patti Smith
Under The Big Black Sun: A Personal History Of L.A.Punk (John Doe With Tom DeSavia) — (Various
Artists)
Unfaithful Music & Disappearing Ink — Elvis Costello

Also Read: Grammy Parties: Katy Perry Recalls Her Days as a ‘Walking Overdraft Fee of $38’ (Video)

Best Song Written For Visual Media
“Can’t Stop The Feeling!” — Max Martin, Shellback &Justin Timberlake, songwriters (Justin Timberlake, Anna Kendrick, Gwen Stefani, James Corden, Zooey Deschanel, Walt Dohrn, Ron Funches, Caroline Hjelt, Aino Jawo, Christopher Mintz-Plasse & Kunal Nayyar), Track from: Trolls *WINNER

“Heathens” — Tyler Joseph, songwriter (Twenty One Pilots), Track from: Suicide Squad
“Just Like Fire” — Oscar Holter, Max Martin, P!nk & Shellback, songwriters (P!nk), Track from: Alice Through The Looking Glass
“Purple Lamborghini” — Shamann Cooke, Sonny Moore & William Roberts, songwriters (Skrillex & Rick Ross), Track from: Suicide Squad
“Try Everything” — Mikkel S. Eriksen, Sia Furler & Tor Erik Hermansen, songwriters (Shakira), Track from: Zootopia
“The Veil” — Peter Gabriel, songwriter (Peter Gabriel), Track from: Snowden

Best Music Video
“Formation” — Beyoncé *WINNER

“River” — Leon Bridges
“Up & Up” — Coldplay
“Gosh” — Jamie XX
“Upside Down & Inside Out” — OK Go

Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical
Benny Blanco
Greg Kurstin *WINNER
Max Martin
Nineteen85
Ricky Reed

Also Read: Everything You Need to Know About 2017 Grammy Awards Broadcast

Album Of The Year
25 — Adele
Lemonade — Beyoncé
Purpose — Justin Bieber
Views — Drake
A Sailor’s Guide To Earth — Sturgill Simpson

Record Of The Year
“Hello” — Adele
“Formation” — Beyoncé
“7 Years” — Lukas Graham
“Work” — Rihanna Featuring Drake
“Stressed Out” — Twenty One Pilots

Song Of The Year
“Formation” — Khalif Brown, Asheton Hogan, Beyoncé Knowles & Michael L. Williams II, songwriters (Beyoncé)
“Hello” — Adele Adkins & Greg Kurstin, songwriters (Adele)
“I Took A Pill In Ibiza” — Mike Posner, songwriter (Mike Posner)
“Love Yourself” — Justin Bieber, Benjamin Levin & Ed Sheeran, songwriters (Justin Bieber)
“7 Years” — Lukas Forchhammer, Stefan Forrest, Morten Pilegaard & Morten Ristorp, songwriters (Lukas Graham)

Also Read: How to Watch the Grammys Online – Livestream Info

Best Dance/Electronic Album
Skin — Flume
Electronica 1: The Time Machine — Jean-Michel Jarre
Epoch — Tycho
Barbara Barbara, We Face A Shining Future — Underworld
Louie Vega Starring…XXVIII — Louie Vega

Best Alternative Music Album
22, A Million — Bon Iver
Blackstar — David Bowie
The Hope Six Demolition Project — PJ Harvey
Post Pop Depression — Iggy Pop
A Moon Shaped Pool — Radiohead

Also Read: How to Watch the 59th Annual Grammys Red Carpet Coverage Online

Best Urban Contemporary Album
Lemonade — Beyoncé
Ology — Gallant
We Are King — KING
Malibu — Anderson .Paak
Anti — Rihanna

Best Country Solo Performance
“Love Can Go To Hell” — Brandy Clark
“Vice” — Miranda Lambert
“My Church” — Maren Morris
“Church Bells” — Carrie Underwood
“Blue Ain’t Your Color” — Keith Urban

Best Latin Pop Album
Un Besito Mas — Jesse & Joy *WINNER

Ilusión — Gaby Moreno
Similares — Laura Pausini
Seguir Latiendo — Sanalejo
Buena Vida — Diego Torres

Also Read: Grammys 2017: Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ Leads With 9 Nominations

The complete list of nominations can be found at the Grammys website.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Joy Villa Wears a ‘Make America Great Again’ Dress to the Grammys (Photo)

Grammys 2017: Red Carpet Arrivals (Photos)

Grammy Parties: Katy Perry Recalls Her Days as a ‘Walking Overdraft Fee of $38’ (Video)

Everything You Need to Know About 2017 Grammy Awards Broadcast

How to Watch the Grammys Online – Livestream Info

Grammys 2017 winners: See the full list

Music’s biggest night has finally arrived, and this year’s Grammys will be hotly contested with heavy hitters like Adele, Beyoncé, Drake, and Rihanna all up for top awards.

The show will begin Sunday at 8 p.m. ET on CBS, with performances from artists like Katy Perry, Metallica, Lady Gaga, and The Weeknd. While many of the most competitive trophies will be handed out during the ceremony, the Recording Academy will announce some winners beginning at 3 p.m. ET. See a full list of nominees, with winners’ names bolded, below. Check back in for regular updates throughout the night.

Record of the Year
“Hello” Adele
“Formation” Beyoncé
“7 Years” Lukas Graham
“Work” Rihanna ft. Drake
“Stressed Out” Twenty One Pilots

Album of the Year
25 — Adele
Lemonade Beyoncé
Purpose  Justin Bieber
Views  Drake
A Sailor’s Guide to Earth — Sturgill Simpson

Song of the Year
“Formation”  Beyoncé (Khalif Brown, Asheton Hogan, Beyoncé Knowles & Michael Williams II)
“Hello” Adele (Adele Adkins & Greg Kurstin)
“I Took A Pill In Ibiza” Mike Posner (Mike Posner)
“Love Yourself” Justin Bieber (Justin Bieber, Benjamin Levin & Ed Sheeran)
“7 Years”  Lukas Graham (Lukas Forchammer, Stefan Forrest, Morten Pilegaard & Morten Ristorp)

Best New Artist
Kelsea Ballerini
The Chainsmokers
Chance the Rapper
Maren Morris
Anderson .Paak

Best Rap Album
Coloring Book – Chance the Rapper
And the Anonymous Nobody – De La Soul
Major Key – DJ Khaled
Views – Drake
Blank Face LP – ScHoolboy Q
The Life of Pablo – Kanye West

Best Rap/ Sung Performance
“Freedom” – Beyoncé ft. Kendrick Lamar
“Hotline Bling” – Drake
“Broccoli” – DRAM ft. Lil Yachty
“Ultralight Beam” – Kanye West ft. Chance the Rapper, Kelly Price, Kirk Franklin & The Dream
“Famous” – Kanye West ft. Rihanna

Best Rap Performance
“No Problem” — Chance The Rapper Featuring Lil Wayne & 2 Chainz
“Panda” —Desiigner
“Pop Style” — Drake Featuring The Throne
“All The Way Up” — Fat Joe & Remy Ma Featuring French Montana & Infared
“That Part” — ScHoolboy Q Featuring Kanye West

Best Rap Song
“All the Way Up” – Joseph Cartagena, Edward Davadi, Shandel Green, Karim Kharbouch, Andre Christopher Lyon, Reminisce Mackie & Marcello Valenzano, songwriters (Fat Joe & Remy Ma Featuring French Montana & Infared)
“Famous” – Chancelor Bennett, Ross Birchard, Ernest Brown, Andrew Dawson, Kasseem Dean, Mike Dean, Noah Goldstein, Kejuan Muchita, Patrick Reynolds, Kanye West & Cydel Young, songwriters (Kanye West Featuring Rihanna)
“Hotline Bling” – Aubrey Graham & Paul Jefferies, songwriters (Drake)
“No Problem” – Chancelor Bennett, Dwayne Carter & Tauheed Epps, songwriters (Chance The Rapper Featuring Lil Wayne & 2 Chainz)
“Ultralight Beam” – Chancelor Bennett, Kasseem Dean, Mike Dean, Kirk Franklin, Noah Goldstein, Samuel Griesemer, Terius Nash, Jerome Potter, Kelly Price, Nico “Donnie Trumpet” Segal, Derek Watkins, Kanye West & Cydel Young, songwriters (Kanye West Featuring Chance The Rapper, Kelly Price, Kirk Franklin & The-Dream)

Best Pop Duo/ Group Performance
“Closer” – The Chainsmokers ft. Halsey
“7 Years” – Lukas Graham
“Work” – Rihanna ft. Drake
“Cheap Thrills” – Sia ft. Sean Paul
“Stressed Out” – Twenty One Pilots

Best Alternative Music Album
22, A Million — Bon Iver
Blackstar — David Bowie
The Hope Six Demolition Project — PJ Harvey
Post Pop Depression — Iggy Pop
A Moon Shaped Pool — Radiohead

Best Rock Album
California — Blink-182
Tell Me I’m Pretty — Cage The Elephant
Magma — Gojira
Death Of A Bachelor — Panic! At The Disco
Weezer — Weezer

Best Rock Performance
“Joe (Live from Austin City Limits)” – Alabama Shakes
“Don’t Hurt Yourself” – Beyoncé ft. Jack White
“Blackstar” – David Bowie
“The Sound of Silence (Live on Conan) – Disturbed
“Heathens” – Twenty One Pilots”

Best Rock Song
“Blackstar” – David Bowie, songwriter (David Bowie)
“Burn the Witch” – Radiohead, songwriters (Radiohead)
“Hardwired” – James Hetfield & Lars Ulrich, songwriters (Metallica) “Heathens” – Tyler Joseph, songwriter (Twenty One Pilots)
“My Name is Human” – Rich Meyer, Ryan Meyer & Johnny Stevens, songwriters (Highly Suspect)

Best R&B Performance
“Turning’ Me Up” – BJ The Chicago Kid
“Permission” – Ro James
“I Do” – Musiq Soulchild
“Needed Me” – Rihanna
“Cranes in the Sky” – Solange”

Best R&B Song
“Come See Me” – J. Brathwaite, Aubrey Graham & Noah Shebib, songwriters (PartyNextDoor Featuring Drake)
“Exchange” – Michael Hernandez & Bryson Tiller, songwriters (Bryson Tiller)
“Kiss it Better” – Jeff Bhasker, Robyn Fenty, John-Nathan Glass & Teddy Sinclair, songwriters (Rihanna)
“Lake by the Ocean” – Hod David & Musze, songwriters (Maxwell)
“Luv” – Magnus August Høiberg, Benjamin Levin & Daystar Peterson, songwriters (Tory Lanez)

Best Urban Contemporary Album
Lemonade — Beyoncé
Ology — Gallant
We Are King — KING
Malibu — Anderson .Paak
Anti — Rihanna

Best Country Album
Big Day in a Small Town – Brandy Clark
Full Circle – Loretta Lynn
Hero – Maren Morris
A Sailor’s Guide to Earth – Sturgill Simpson
Ripcord – Keith Urban

Best Country Duo/ Group Performance
“Different For Girls” – Dierks Bentley ft. Elle King
“21 Summer” – Brothers Osborne
“Setting the World on Fire” – Kenny Chesney & Pink
“Jolene” – Pentatonix ft. Dolly Parton
“Think of You” – Chris Young with Cassadee Pope

Best Country Song
“Blue Ain’t Your Color” – Clint Lagerberg, Hillary Lindsey & Steven Lee Olsen, songwriters (Keith Urban)
“Die A Happy Man” – Sean Douglas, Thomas Rhett & Joe Spargur, songwriters (Thomas Rhett)
“Humble and Kind” – Lori McKenna, songwriter (Tim McGraw)
“My Church” – busbee & Maren Morris, songwriters (Maren Morris)
“Vice” – Miranda Lambert, Shane McAnally & Josh Osborne, songwriters (Miranda Lambert)

Best Country Solo Performance
“Love Can Go To Hell” — Brandy Clark
“Vice” — Miranda Lambert
“My Church” — Maren Morris
“Church Bells” — Carrie Underwood
“Blue Ain’t Your Color” — Keith Urban

Best Pop Vocal Album
25 — Adele
Purpose — Justin Bieber
Dangerous Woman — Ariana Grande
Confident — Demi Lovato
This Is Acting — Sia

Best Pop Solo Performance
“Hello” – Adele
“Hold Up” – Beyoncé
“Love Yourself” – Justin Bieber
“Piece By Piece (Idol Version) – Kelly Clarkson
“Dangerous Woman” – Ariana Grande

Best Dance Electronic Album
Skin — Flume
Electronica 1: The Time Machine — Jean-Michel Jarre
Epoch — Tycho
Barbara Barbara, We Face A Shining Future — Underworld
Louie Vega Starring…XXVIII — Louie Vega

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album
Cinema – Andrea Bocelli
Fallen Angels – Bob Dylan Stages Live – Josh Groban
Summertime: Willie Nelson Sings Gershwin – Willie Nelson
Encore: Movie Partners Sing Broadway – Barbra Streisand

Best Dance Recording
“Tearing Me Up” – Bob Moses
“Don’t Let Me Down” – The Chainsmokers ft. Daya
“Never Be Like You” – Flume ft. Kai
“Rinse & Repeat” – Riton ft. Kah-Lo
“Drinkee” – Sofi Tukker

Best Metal Performance “Shock Me” – Baroness
“Silvera” – Gojira
“Rotting in Vain” – Korn
“Dystopia” – Megadeath
“The Price is Wrong” – Periphery

Producer of the Year, Non-Classical
Benny Blanco
Greg Kurstin
Max Martin
Nineteen85
Ricky Reed

Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media
Amy
Miles Ahead
Straight Outta Compton
Suicide Squad (Collector’s Edition)
Vinyl: The Essentials Season 1

Best Song Written for Visual Media
“Can’t Stop The Feeling!” — Max Martin, Shellback & Justin Timberlake, songwriters (Justin Timberlake, Anna Kendrick, Gwen Stefani, James Corden, Zooey Deschanel, Walt Dohrn, Ron Funches, Caroline Hjelt, Aino Jawo, Christopher Mintz-Plasse & Kunal Nayyar), Track from: Trolls
“Heathens” — Tyler Joseph, songwriter (Twenty One Pilots), Track from: Suicide Squad
“Just Like Fire” — Oscar Holter, Max Martin, P!nk & Shellback, songwriters (P!nk), Track from: Alice Through The Looking Glass
“Purple Lamborghini” — Shamann Cooke, Sonny Moore & William Roberts, songwriters (Skrillex & Rick Ross), Track from: Suicide Squad
“Try Everything” — Mikkel S. Eriksen, Sia Furler & Tor Erik Hermansen, songwriters (Shakira), Track from: Zootopia
“The Veil” — Peter Gabriel, songwriter (Peter Gabriel), Track from: Snowden

Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media
Bridge of Spies
Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight
The Revenant
Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Stranger Things Volume 1
Stranger Things Volume 2

Best Music Video
“Formation” — Beyoncé
“River” — Leon Bridges
“Up & Up” — Coldplay
“Gosh” — Jamie XX
“Upside Down & Inside Out” — OK Go

Best Music Film
I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead (Steve Aoki)
The Beatle: Eight Days A Week The Touring Years (The Beatles)
Lemonade (Beyoncé)
The Music of Strangers (Yo-Yo Ma & The Silk Road Ensemble)
American Saturday Night: Live from the Grand Ole Opry (Various Artists)
Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling)
The Girl With The Lower Back Tattoo – Amy Schumer
In Such Good Company: Eleven Years Of Laughter, Mayhem, And Fun In The Sandbox – Carol Burnett
M Train – Patti Smith
Under The Big Black Sun: A Personal History Of L.A. Punk (John Doe With Tom Desavia) (Various Artists) – Tom DeSavia, John Doe, Scott Sherratt & Dan Zitt, producers
Unfaithful Music & Disappearing Ink – Elvis Costello

Best Comedy Album
…America…Great… – David Cross
American Myth – Margaret Cho
Boyish Girl Interrupted – Tig Notaro
Live at the Apollo – Amy Schumer
Talking for Clapping – Patton Oswalt

Best Musical Theater Album
Bright Star
The Color Purple
Fiddler On the Roof Kinky Boots
Waitress 

Best Gospel Performance/Song
“It’s Alright, It’s OK” — Shirley Caesar Featuring Anthony Hamilton; Stanley Brown & Courtney Rumble, songwriters
“You’re Bigger ” — Jekalyn Carr; Allundria Carr, songwriter
“Made A Way ” — Travis Greene; Travis Greene, songwriter
“God Provides” — Tamela Mann; Kirk Franklin, songwriter
“Better” — Hezekiah Walker; Jason Clayborn, Gabriel Hatcher & Hezekiah Walker, songwriters

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song
“Trust In You” — Lauren Daigle; Lauren Daigle, Michael Farren & Paul Mabury, songwriters
“Priceless” — For King & Country; Benjamin Backus, Seth Mosley, Joel Smallbone, Luke Smallbone & Tedd Tjornhom, songwriters
“King of the World” — Natalie Grant; Natalie Grant, Becca Mizell & Samuel Mizell, songwriters
“Thy Will” — Hillary Scott & The Scott Family; Bernie Herms, Hillary Scott & Emily Weisband, songwriters Track from: Love Remains
“Chain Breaker” — Zach Williams; Mia Fieldes, Jonathan Smith & Zach Williams, songwriters

Best Gospel Album
Listen —Tim Bowman Jr.
Fill This House — Shirley Caesar
A Worshipper’s Heart —Todd Dulaney
Losing My Religion — Kirk Franklin
Demonstrate —William Murphy

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album
Poets & Saints — All Sons & Daughters
American Prodigal — Crowder
Be One — Natalie Grant
Youth Revival — Hillsong Young & Free
Love Remains — Hillary Scott & The Scott Family

Best Roots Gospel Album
Better Together — Gaither Vocal Band
Nature’s Symphony In 432 — The Isaacs
Hymns — Joey+Rory
Hymns And Songs Of Inspiration — Gordon Mote
God Don’t Ever Change: The Songs Of Blind Willie Johnson — (Various Artists)

Best Latin Pop Album
Un Besito Mas — Jesse & Joy
Ilusión — Gaby Moreno
Similares — Laura Pausini
Seguir Latiendo — Sanalejo
Buena Vida — Diego Torres

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album
iLevitable — ile
L.H.O.N. (La Humanidad O Nosotros) — Illya Kuryaki & The Valderamas
Buenaventura — La Santa Cecilia
Los Rakas — Los Rakas
Amor Supremo — Carla Morrison

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano)
Raíces — Banda El Recodo De Cruz Lizárraga
Hecho A Mano — Joss Favela
Un Azteca En El Azteca, Vol. 1 (En Vivo) — Vicente Fernández
Generación Maquinaria Est. 2006 — La Maquinaria Norteña
Tributo A Joan Sebastian Y Rigoberto Alfaro — Mariachi Divas De Cindy Shea

Best Tropical Latin Album
Conexión — Fonseca
La Fantasia Homenaje A Juan Formell — Formell Y Los Van Van
35 Aniversario — Grupo Niche
La Sonora Santanera En Su 60 Aniversario — La Sonora Santanera
Donde Están? — Jose Lugo & Guasábara Combo

Best American Roots Performance
“Ain’t No Man” — The Avett Brothers
“Mother’s Children Have A Hard Time” — Blind Boys Of Alabama
“Factory Girl” — Rhiannon Giddens
“House Of Mercy” — Sarah Jarosz
“Wreck You” — Lori McKenna

Best American Roots Song
“Alabama At Night” — Robbie Fulks, songwriter (Robbie Fulks)
“City Lights” — Jack White, songwriter (Jack White)
“Gulfstream” — Eric Adcock & Roddie Romero, songwriters (Roddie Romero And The Hub City All-Stars)
“Kid Sister” — Vince Gill, songwriter (The Time Jumpers)
“Wreck You” — Lori McKenna & Felix McTeigue, songwriters (Lori McKenna)

Best Americana Album
True Sadness — The Avett Brothers
This Is Where I Live — William Bell
The Cedar Creek Sessions — Kris Kristofferson
The Bird & The Rifle — Lori McKenna
Kid Sister — The Time Jumper

Best Bluegrass Album
Original Traditional — Blue Highway
Burden Bearer — Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver
The Hazel Sessions — Laurie Lewis & The Right Hands
North And South — Claire Lynch
Coming Home — O’Connor Band With Mark O’Connor

Best Traditional Blues Album
Can’t Shake The Feeling — Lurrie Bell
Live At The Greek Theatre — Joe Bonamassa
Blues & Ballads (A Folksinger’s Songbook: Volumes I & II) — Luther Dickinson
The Soul of Jimmie Rodgers — Vasti Jackson
Porcupine Meat — Bobby Rush

Best Contemporary Blues Album
The Last Days Of Oakland — Fantastic Negrito
Love Wins Again — Janiva Magness
Bloodline — Kenny Neal
Give It Back To You — The Record Company
Everybody Wants A Piece — Joe Louis Walker

Folk Album
Silver Skies Blue — Judy Collins & Ari Hest
Upland Stories — Robbie Fulks
Factory Girl — Rhiannon Giddens
Weighted Mind — Sierra Hull
Undercurrent — Sarah Jarosz

Best Regional Roots Music Album
Broken Promised Land — Barry Jean Ancelet & Sam Broussard
It’s A Cree Thing — Northern Cree
E Walea — Kalani Pe’a
Gulfstream — Roddie Romero And The Hub City All-Stars
I Wanna Sing Right: Rediscovering Lomax In The Evangeline Country — (Various Artists)

Best Reggae Album
Sly & Robbie Presents… Reggae For Her – Devin Di Dakta & J.L
Rose Petals — J Boog
Ziggy Marley — Ziggy Marley
Everlasting — Raging Fyah
Falling Into Place — Rebelution
Soja: Live In Virginia — Soja

Best World Music Album
Destiny — Celtic Woman
Walking In The Footsteps Of Our Fathers — Ladysmith Black Mambazo
Sing Me Home — Yo-Yo Ma & The Silk Road Ensemble
Land Of Gold — Anoushka Shankar
Dois Amigos, Um Século De Música: Multishow Live — Caetano Veloso & Gilberto Gil

Best Children’s Album
Explorer Of The World — Frances England
Infinity Plus One — Secret Agent 23 Skidoo
Novelties — Recess Monkey
Press Play — Brady Rymer And The Little Band That Could
Saddle Up — The Okee Dokee Brothers

Grammys 2017: Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ Leads With 9 Nominations

Beyonce leads the list of the 2017 Grammy nominations, having earned nine total, including Album of the Year for “Lemonade,” as well as Song of the Year and Record of the year for lead single “Formation.” The visual component, which debuted on HBO in April and earned four Emmy nominations, is also up for Best Music Film.

Drake, Rihanna and Kanye West each earned eight nominations, and Chance the Rapper rounds out the top five with seven for his third mixtape “Coloring Book” and guest work on Kanye West’s “The Life of Pablo.”

Tuesday’s nine nominations bring Beyonce’s career total to 62, which makes her the most-nominated female artist in Grammy history. If she wins in eight of the categories, she’ll have a total of 28 awards, surpassing country singer Alison Krauss as the most-awarded female artist.

Also Read: Here’s How the Grammys Told LL Cool J They’re Going With James Corden

West is up in eight categories, but the rapper has previously pledged to boycott the ceremony. After Frank Ocean’s two 2016 albums “Endless” and “Blonde” were disqualified in October because the R&B singer failed to submit the necessary documents before the deadline, West announced he’d skip the awards to “fight the bulls—.”

This year’s awards will be broadcast on CBS on Sunday, Feb. 12 at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT. “The Late Late Show’s” James Corden will serve as host.

“Just as we see emerging musicians experimenting, we’re also seeing established artists resisting what’s expected of them and, instead, embracing the creative freedom they’ve been afforded through their success, blurring the lines between music’s mainstream and artistic edge,” said Neil Portnow, President and CEO of The Recording Academy, in a statement.

Also Read: Inside Grammys Rehearsals: ‘I Hope It Will Be a Political Show,’ Producer Says

See a partial list of the nominees below, and the complete list of nominations in all 84 categories at the Grammys website.

Album Of The Year:
25 — Adele
Lemonade — Beyoncé
Purpose — Justin Bieber
Views — Drake
A Sailor’s Guide To Earth — Sturgill Simpson

Record Of The Year:
“Hello” — Adele
“Formation” — Beyoncé
“7 Years” — Lukas Graham
“Work” — Rihanna Featuring Drake
“Stressed Out” — Twenty One Pilots

Song Of The Year:
“Formation” — Khalif Brown, Asheton Hogan, Beyoncé Knowles & Michael L. Williams II, songwriters (Beyoncé)
“Hello” — Adele Adkins & Greg Kurstin, songwriters (Adele)
“I Took A Pill In Ibiza” — Mike Posner, songwriter (Mike Posner)
“Love Yourself” — Justin Bieber, Benjamin Levin & Ed Sheeran, songwriters (Justin Bieber)
“7 Years” — Lukas Forchhammer, Stefan Forrest, Morten Pilegaard & Morten Ristorp, songwriters (Lukas Graham)

Best New Artist:
Kelsea Ballerini
The Chainsmokers
Chance The Rapper
Maren Morris
Anderson .Paak

Best Pop Vocal Album:
25 — Adele
Purpose — Justin Bieber
Dangerous Woman — Ariana Grande
Confident — Demi Lovato
This Is Acting — Sia

Best Dance/Electronic Album:
Skin — Flume
Electronica 1: The Time Machine — Jean-Michel Jarre
Epoch — Tycho
Barbara Barbara, We Face A Shining Future — Underworld
Louie Vega Starring…XXVIII — Louie Vega

Best Rock Album:
California — Blink-182
Tell Me I’m Pretty — Cage The Elephant
Magma — Gojira
Death Of A Bachelor — Panic! At The Disco
Weezer — Weezer

Best Alternative Music Album:
22, A Million — Bon Iver
Blackstar — David Bowie
The Hope Six Demolition Project — PJ Harvey
Post Pop Depression — Iggy Pop
A Moon Shaped Pool — Radiohead

Best Urban Contemporary Album:
Lemonade — Beyoncé
Ology — Gallant
We Are King — KING
Malibu — Anderson .Paak
Anti — Rihanna

Best Rap Performance:
“No Problem” — Chance The Rapper Featuring Lil Wayne & 2 Chainz
“Panda” –Desiigner
“Pop Style” — Drake Featuring The Throne
“All The Way Up” — Fat Joe & Remy Ma Featuring French Montana & Infared
“That Part” — ScHoolboy Q Featuring Kanye West

Best Country Solo Performance:
“Love Can Go To Hell” — Brandy Clark
“Vice” — Miranda Lambert
“My Church” — Maren Morris
“Church Bells” — Carrie Underwood
“Blue Ain’t Your Color” — Keith Urban

Best Jazz Vocal Album:
Sound Of Red — René Marie
Upward Spiral — Branford Marsalis Quartet With Special Guest Kurt Elling
Take Me To The Alley — Gregory Porter
Harlem On My Mind — Catherine Russell
The Sting Variations — The Tierney Sutton Band

Best Gospel Album:
Listen –Tim Bowman Jr.
Fill This House — Shirley Caesar
A Worshipper’s Heart [Live] –Todd Dulaney
Losing My Religion — Kirk Franklin
Demonstrate [Live] –William Murphy

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album:
Poets & Saints — All Sons & Daughters
American Prodigal — Crowder
Be One — Natalie Grant
Youth Revival [Live] — Hillsong Young & Free
Love Remains — Hillary Scott & The Scott Family

Best Latin Pop Album:
Un Besito Mas — Jesse & Joy
Ilusión — Gaby Moreno
Similares — Laura Pausini
Seguir Latiendo — Sanalejo
Buena Vida — Diego Torres

Best American Roots Performance:
“Ain’t No Man” — The Avett Brothers
“Mother’s Children Have A Hard Time” — Blind Boys Of Alabama
“Factory Girl” — Rhiannon Giddens
“House Of Mercy” — Sarah Jarosz
“Wreck You” — Lori McKenna

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling):
The Girl With The Lower Back Tattoo — Amy Schumer
In Such Good Company: Eleven Years Of Laughter, Mayhem, And Fun In The Sandbox — Carol Burnett
M Train — Patti Smith
Under The Big Black Sun: A Personal History Of L.A.Punk (John Doe With Tom DeSavia) — (Various
Artists)
Unfaithful Music & Disappearing Ink — Elvis Costello

Best Song Written For Visual Media:
“Can’t Stop The Feeling!” — Max Martin, Shellback &Justin Timberlake, songwriters (Justin Timberlake, Anna Kendrick, Gwen Stefani, James Corden, Zooey Deschanel, Walt Dohrn, Ron Funches, Caroline Hjelt, Aino Jawo, Christopher Mintz-Plasse & Kunal Nayyar), Track from: Trolls
“Heathens” — Tyler Joseph, songwriter (Twenty One Pilots), Track from: Suicide Squad
“Just Like Fire” — Oscar Holter, Max Martin, P!nk & Shellback, songwriters (P!nk), Track from: Alice Through The Looking Glass
“Purple Lamborghini” — Shamann Cooke, Sonny Moore & William Roberts, songwriters (Skrillex & Rick Ross), Track from: Suicide Squad
“Try Everything” — Mikkel S. Eriksen, Sia Furler & Tor Erik Hermansen, songwriters (Shakira), Track from: Zootopia
“The Veil” — Peter Gabriel, songwriter (Peter Gabriel), Track from: Snowden

Best Music Video:
“Formation” — Beyoncé
“River” — Leon Bridges
“Up & Up” — Coldplay
“Gosh” — Jamie XX
“Upside Down & Inside Out” — OK Go

Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical:
Benny Blanco
Greg Kurstin
Max Martin
Nineteen85
Ricky Reed

Related stories from TheWrap:

Grammy Nominations Predictions 2017, From Beyonce to Adele to Chance the Rapper

David Bowie, Prince Songs Among 2017 Grammy Hall of Famers

17 All-Time Best Grammys Performances From Adele to Whitney Houston (Videos)

In tune with the brand: Empowering the next generation of music makers

The Recording Academy has one night a year on the global stage. Made up of musicians, producers, recording engineers and many others in the music industry, it is the non-profit organization behind star-studded awards ceremony the Grammys.

For the other 364 days of the year, Evan Greene – who has served as the organization’s chief marketing officer for nearly 14 years – and his team dedicate their time to supporting the industry.

The Academy is dedicated to empowering the next generation of music makers. In 2008, it opened the Grammy Museum at LA Live in downtown Los Angeles. Devoted to the history of music, as well as celebrating Grammy winners, it serves as an educational cornerstone, utilizing interactive exhibits and rare memorabilia that inspire visitors to learn more about music.

Rooted in its goal of positively impacting the lives of musicians, industry members and society at large, the Academy also offers an array of advocacy programs – ‘Grammys On The Hill’ in Washington brings together artists and legislators who have made strides in establishing fair compensation throughout the industry, while ‘Grammys in My District’ brings music creators to local offices of elected officials where they are recognized for mattering within the voting constituency.

From a grassroots level all the way to the White House, these advocacy programs allow the music community’s points of view to be heard, as well as opening up a dialog between the music industry and the general public.

Credibility through authenticity

“We have a body of members that we advocate for, and on behalf of, for intellectual property protection and artists’ rights,” Greene explains. “We want to make sure that creators get recognized appropriately.”

Greene’s greatest priority lies in being credible to fans and musicians without speaking in completely different voices to either one. “The way we do that is through authenticity, which is the cornerstone of trust. With trust, you build loyalty and that’s what it’s about for us.”

Part of that trust is visible – the Grammy award statue. But the Grammy, as a brand, has become more relatable to fans over the past decade, Greene says, because fans know that artists care about more than just the award and artists care more because they understand and recognize the strong foundational platform that it sits atop – The Recording Academy.

“The Academy means more to music, and the Grammy means more to music. Together, they represent excellence across the board.”

Artists giving back

Being able to give back is at the root of The Recording Academy and its artists, says Greene. “People in the creative community are generally charitable, and feel a sense of kinship, humanity and connection.

“Artists that are successful feel blessed, and they want to be able to give back. Many times, they don’t know how. We give them that channel and that opportunity to be able to connect and actually make a difference.”

Because of this channel, it’s not unusual for the Academy to bring students to see musicians like Justin Timberlake during a sound check and then hold a Q&A session. Managers, attorneys and other industry professionals also participate in youth-related programs. The support from all levels of the artist community is, according to Greene, overwhelmingly positive. Innately, they all want to nurture and inspire others to achieve their dreams.

Education is a passion point for the Academy and it likes to bring artists back to their roots – especially to schools that have struggling music programs or are committed to teaching music to children. In one case, several years ago, the Academy visited a high school in Michigan with Kid Rock who happened to be one of that school’s most famous alum.

“The kids didn’t know what to expect. They instantly went crazy.”

An Academy executive, along with Kid Rock, gave the school a ‘Grammy Signature School’ award, a plaque featuring a 3D Grammy statue. The Academy also gave the school a grant and Kid Rock was so inspired he “doubled the grant on the spot” says Greene.

Reinvesting in music’s future

At the heart of the Academy’s mission is making sure that the revenues generated are filtered back into the industry. Beyond serving the Academy’s members, Greene is adamant that the funding is used to give back and ensure that music continues to drive and inspire culture.

“What’s important is not only educating people about the cultural power and impact of music, but also trying to find ways that people can learn music. There are so many studies that clearly make a connection between using the creativity in your brain and long-term success.”

Unfortunately, music struggles most in the very place the Academy tirelessly fights for it: schools. Arts funding is one of the first initiatives to be cut from schools and Greene is blunt in recognizing that the issues therein are bigger than the Grammys, or even the schools themselves.

Through it all, Greene and his team continue to fight the good fight to find ways where the next generation of music makers can learn about music and embrace its exponential benefits.

“It’s very important to find ways to create new education opportunities, recognize and honor those schools and music programs that have been dedicating themselves to promoting music education. It’s such an important, healthy gift to society.”

A credible part of the conversation

Fans and consumers are more involved and engaged than ever before, but they are also demanding, jaded and distrustful. If a brand slips up, screenshots of its faux pas will circulate and go viral. Transparency and sincerity are in while canned apologies and avoiding interaction with fans has long been out.

With an engaged ecosystem of 11 million friends, fans and followers, Greene, a 2016 Grand Clio Music winner, takes great pride in the Academy’s approach, especially in the digital and social world. “Rather than simply talk to people for six weeks before the Grammys in February, we seek to always be a credible voice and part of the daily music conversation.”

At the core, it’s a very simple strategy: engage in a sincere, respectful, two-way dialogue. “We simply want to be a relevant, credible part of the conversation and to recognize and honor those who have made the greatest contribution to the creative community that year.”

Looking into the future

In the end, the Grammys wouldn’t be possible without the underpinnings of The Recording Academy and next on the agenda, from a marketing and a messaging perspective, is ensuring that The Recording Academy gets more widely recognized for the work that it does throughout the industry. Rather than competing with the Grammy brand, however, it wants to communicate that the Academy is what makes the Grammy Awards special.

“The heart of our mission is to help creators continue to create,” says Greene, “and to represent the most credible voice in music for creators.”

This article was originally published in The Drum magazine.

‘Legion’ has a Pink Floyd Connection You Might Not Have Noticed

(Some light spoilers ahead for the premiere of FX’s “Legion”)

Astute classic rock fans might have picked up on an interesting Easter Egg in the premiere episode of the FX superhero show “Legion.” It’s a nod to the legendary band Pink Floyd.

Based on the “X-Men” comic character, “Legion” follows the story of David Haller (Dan Stevens), a guy who hears voices and has superpowers. In the first episode, Haller is living in some kind of 1970s mental institution, and meets another patient, Syd (Rachel Keller). The pair get close (although Syd can’t handle being touched), until events tear them away from each other.

If you’re up on your rock history, you might find Syd’s full name ringing bells. It’s Syd Barrett — the same as the late founding member of Pink Floyd. Barrett is credited with giving the band its name, but left the band in 1968. He died in 2006.

Also Read: ‘Legion’: Does New FX Show Connect to the ‘X-Men’ Movies?

In fact, Pink Floyd plays a big part in “Legion.” Last year at New York Comic-Con, executive producer Noah Hawley said that when the show was first being brought together, he met with composer Jeff Russo to talk about its sound. Hawley said he told Russo he wanted “Legion” to invoke Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon.”

“That album more than anything is really the soundscape of mental illness to some degree,” Hawley said at Comic-Con.

The Pink Floyd, “Dark Side”-inspired feel permeates “Legion,” and the surreal presentation throughout the first episode makes it difficult identifying what’s real. That’s very much in line with David’s experience in life — he hears voices and has trouble separating reality from fantasy. The twist is that David’s latent mutant powers might be the reason for his mental instability.

Also Read: Why FX’s New Superhero is Called ‘Legion’ (Hint: Bible Reasons)

“Legion” also has a very ’70’s-inspired aesthetic throughout, in keeping with “Dark Side of the Moon,” which was released in 1973. That may also be a nod to the “X-Men” connection in “Legion.” The show’s look reminds a lot of “X-Men: First Class,” which is set in the 1960s, and “X-Men: Days of Future Past” — which is set in 1973.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Why FX’s New Superhero is Called ‘Legion’ (Hint: Bible Reasons)

‘Legion’: Does New FX Show Connect to the ‘X-Men’ Movies?

‘Legion’ Creator on How X-Men Spinoff Goes Where No Superhero Adaptation Has Gone Before

Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Kesha, more announced as SXSW speakers

Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Kesha, Sen. Cory Booker, and more will converge in Austin as part of the 2017 South by Southwest festival.

SXSW announced Tuesday its growing list of featured speakers has expanded to include even more influential public figures, including actor Seth Rogen, Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, GLAAD president Sarah Kate Ellis, musician Mick Fleetwood, Tinder founder Sean Rad, investor Chris Sacca, Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards, and Better Call Saul star Bob Odenkirk.

Additionally, SXSW revealed Jessica Shortall, managing director of Texas Competes, will address festivalgoers as one of the event’s keynote speaker. Texas Competes is a coalition of more than 1,200 Texas-based companies championing the rights of the LGBTQIA community in the state.

“Jessica is a staunch advocate of equality, fairness, and decency. Her relentless pursuit and approach of these values is both influential and inspirational,” Hugh Forrest, chief programming officer for SXSW, said via statement. “At a time when human rights are front and center in the U.S. we think this message of inclusion will resonate not just through her keynote but throughout much of our conference programming, where it has emerged as a major theme.”

Shortall’s fellow SXSW keynote speakers include Lee Daniels, Jennifer Doudna, Gareth Edwards, Adam Grant, Zane Lowe, Cory Richards, Nile Rodgers, and Jill Soloway.

SXSW 2017 takes place from March 10-19 in Austin. Check out the festival’s entire schedule here, and read on for a full list of featured speakers, per an SXSW press release, below.

KEYNOTEJessica Shortall (Social Impact) – Jessica is the Managing Director of Texas Competes, a coalition of more than 1,200 Texas companies making the data-driven case for Texas to be welcoming to LGBTQ people. This business-oriented voice has become a national model.

FEATURED SPEAKERSBuzz Aldrin with Jeff Kluger (Entertainment Influencers) – Buzz Aldrin is an American engineer and former astronaut known for his historic Apollo 11 moonwalk with colleague Neil Armstrong. Since retiring from NASA and the U.S. Air Force, Aldrin has remained a tireless advocate for human space exploration. Jeffrey Kluger is the Editor at Large for Time magazine and Time.com, principally covering science and social issues.

Sen. Cory Booker (Government) – New Jersey Senator and former Newark Mayor Cory Booker has established himself as an innovative and bipartisan problem-solver committed to developing collaborative solutions that address some of our most complex challenges. Booker will be the opening speaker at SXSW 2017.

John Cena (Sports) – John Cena is a WWE Superstar, 16-time World Champion, actor and television host. Cena devotes much of his time working on behalf of numerous charitable causes. He is Make-A-Wish’s most requested wish granter of all time and the only celebrity to grant 500 wishes.

Julia Louis-DreyfusAnna Chlumsky, Tony HaleMatt WalshTimothy SimonsReid ScottGary ColeSam Richardson, and David Mandel (Entertainment Influencers) – Join Julia Louis-Dreyfus and the cast of Veep for an intimate and behind the scenes look at the award winning show. Veep will return to HBO for a sixth season.

Andrew Coy and Sonya M. Pryor-Jones (Tech Industry) – Andrew Coy served in President Obama’s White House in the Office of Science and Technology Policy as Senior Advisor for Making. Sonya M. Pryor-Jones is the Chief Implementation Officer for The Fab Foundation and manages signature projects with Chevron, DARPA and GE.

Nick Denton and Jeff Goodby (Journalism) – Nick Denton is the founder and former proprietor of the Gawker Media Group, one of the most freewheeling and provocative sites on the web that was shuttered after a legal campaign funded by one of the tech billionaires it covered — and provoked. Jeff Goodby is a writer, artist, director and the co-founder of award-winning advertising agency Goodby, Silverstein & Partners.

Sarah Kate Ellis, Sean RadNick Adams, and Zackary Drucker (Social Impact) – Sarah Kate Ellis is the president and CEO of GLAAD, the world’s leading LGBTQ media advocacy organization. Sean Rad is the founder and chairman of Tinder. Nick Adams is the director of GLAAD’s Transgender Media Program. Zackary Drucker is an independent artist, activist, and producer of the TV series Transparent.

Amy Farley (Food) – Senior editor Amy Farley oversees Fast Company’s front-of-book Next section, covering innovation and creativity in business. Before joining Fast Company, she was the news editor and columnist at Travel + Leisure. Farley will interview The Kitchen founder Kimbal Musk.

Tim Ferriss and Cheryl Strayed (Journalism) – Tim Ferriss is an early-stage technology investor/advisor and the author of four #1 New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestsellers. Cheryl Strayed is the author of the #1 New York Times bestselling memoir Wild and the New York Times bestsellers Tiny Beautiful Things and Brave Enough.

Mick Fleetwood (Music Influencers) – Mick Fleetwood is a founding member and the drummer for Fleetwood Mac, one of the most successful and enduring bands of the last fifty years. Formed in 1967, their debut hit at #4 in the UK charts bringing overnight success. Fleetwood’s latest endeavor is his forthcoming book Love That Burns – A Chronicle of Fleetwood Mac (Genesis Publications).

Sammy Hagar (Music Influencers) – For the last four decades, Sammy Hagar has been one of rock music’s most dynamic and prolific artists. From breaking into the industry with the seminal hard rock band Montrose, to a multiplatinum solo career. Hagar has also become a dedicated philanthropist, a two-time New York Times bestselling author and auspicious entrepreneur.

Brad Jakeman (Workplace) – Brad Jakeman is president of PepsiCo Global Beverage Group. Jakeman leads global category strategy, brand building, design, advertising, marketing, innovation and branded content for PepsiCo’s global portfolio of beverages. He will be joining the Elephant on Madison Avenue featured session.

Bryan JohnsonAdam CheyerReshma Shetty, and Chris Shipley (Intelligent Future) – American entrepreneur and venture capitalist Bryan Johnson is founder and CEO of Kernel and OS Fund. Adam Cheyer is co-Founder and VP Engineering at Viv Labs and was co-founder and vice president of engineering of Siri Inc. Reshma Shetty co-founded synthetic biology Ginkgo Bioworks Inc. Chris Shipley is a writer, analyst, commentator, and co-founder & CEO of Guidewire Group.

Kesha and Amy Emmerich (Social Impact) – Kesha has taken the world by storm since the release of her debut album Animal in 2010. Kesha has had eight consecutive Top 10 hits, including four #1 singles. Kesha has branched out into TV, philanthropy, film, and fashion becoming a global cultural icon. Amy Emmerich is the chief content officer at Refinery29, the leading digital lifestyle media company for women.

Brian KnappenbergerJulie BushMichael Farrell, and Walter Parkes (Entertainment Influencers) – Brian Knappenberger is an award-winning filmmaker and director of NOBODY SPEAK: Trials of the Free Press. Julie Bush is a screenwriter and host of the podcast Threat Surface. Michael Farrell is an editor at The Christian Science Monitor. Walter F. Parkes is an American film producer, screenwriter, and former studio head.

Loic Le MeurLili ChengEugenia Kuyda and Stan Chudnovsky (Brands & Marketing) – Loic Le Meur co-founded LeWeb, one of the largest European tech events. Lili Cheng is a Distinguished Engineer and General Manager in Microsoft Artificial Intelligence and Research. Eugenia Kuyda is co-founder and CEO at Luka. Stan Chudnovsky is Head of Product for Messaging at Facebook.

Mike LucianoPhil Matarese, and Jen Roskind (Making Film & Episodics) – Mike Luciano and Phil Matarese are the creators, and Jen Roskind is the co-executive producer, of the HBO animated show Animals alongside the Duplass Brothers. The inaugural two episodes premiered at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival followed by a full season debut on HBO in 2016. Season two premieres on HBO beginning March 17.

Krist Novoselic (Music Influencers) – A member of the groundbreaking rock band Nirvana, Krist Novoselic and his bandmates changed the course of music history with their much-acclaimed album Nevermind. Novoselic went on to become one of rock’s most politically-minded musicians and an influential part of the Northwest political scene. He serves as Board chair for FairVote, a non-profit that seeks to make democracy fair.

Bob Odenkirk (Entertainment Influencers) – Bob Odenkirk is an Emmy® Award-winning comedy writer, producer, actor and New York Times bestselling author. In 2015, Odenkirk reprised the character he originated on the hit drama Breaking Bad, playing the title role in AMC’s Better Call Saul, which has earned him two Critics’ Choice TV Awards and nominations for an Emmy, Golden Globe and SAG Award.

Frank Oz and Leonard Maltin (Entertainment Influencers) – Oz is a four time Emmy winner and he’s performed with The Muppets and on the Star Wars films. He’s also directed over a dozen films including Little Shop of Horrors, and The Score. Leonard Maltin is one of the world’s most respected film critics and historians. He is best known for his widely-used reference work Leonard Maltin’s Movie Guide and its companion volume Leonard Maltin’s Classic Movie Guide.

Cecile Richards and David Karp (Social Impact) – Cecile Richards is president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America and Planned Parenthood Action Fund. David Karp is the founder and CEO of Tumblr, a platform home to more than 300 million creators, and also a board member of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

Seth RogenEvan GoldbergSam Catlin, and Garth Ennis (Film & TV Industry) – Seth Rogen is an actor, writer, producer and director known for his work on Sausage Party and Preacher. Evan Goldberg is a Canadian director, screenwriter and executive producer on Preacher. Sam Catlin is the showrunner, executive producer and writer of Preacher. Garth Ennis has been writing comics for 25 years and is the co-executive producer for Preacher.

Kerry Rupp (Startup Village) – Kerry Rupp is a General Partner at True Wealth Ventures, a new early-stage venture capital fund investing in women-led businesses in the sustainable consumer and consumer health sectors. Rupp will join Professor Bob Metcalfe and University of Texas at Austin President Greg Fenves in a discussion about evolving startups at the university level.

Chris Sacca (Startup Village) –  Chris Sacca is the founder and chairman of Lowercase Capital, reported to be one of the most successful venture funds in history. These days, you can catch him as a Shark on Shark Tank doing everything he can to make Mark Cuban and Kevin O’Leary miserable.

Bruce Sterling (Tech Industry) – Bruce Sterling is an author, journalist, editor and critic who is best known for 10 science fiction novels, in addition to his short stories, book reviews, design criticism, opinion columns and book introductions. His most recent publication is a collection of Italian fantascienza stories, Utopia Pirata: I Racconti Di Bruno Argento (2016).

Jake Tapper (Government) – CNN anchor and chief Washington correspondent Jake Tapper joined the network in 2013. He is the host of The Lead with Jake Tapper and the network’s Sunday morning show, State of the Union. Jake Tapper will interview General Paul J. Selva who is the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Elliot TebeleJessica TebeleJames Ohliger, and Mick Purzycki (Tech Industry) – Elliot Tebele (@f—jerry), Jessica Tebele (@beigecardigan), James Ohliger (@krispyshorts), and Mick Purzycki (@jerrynews) are heading to SXSW to lead a moderated discussion on the business of social, the future of how we’ll consume media, and what they’ve learned along the way. Move over cash, content is the new king.

Cindy Wilson (Music Influencers) – Cindy Wilson is a singer, and is one of the lead vocalists, songwriter and a founding member of new wave rock band The B-52s. Her new solo project is as far from The B-52s as one can possibly imagine. Wilson swoons and whispers over swirls of subtle psychedelia, Quincy Jones- era strings, and pulsing synths.

Grammy winner and Nike ambassador Seu Jorge on Bowie and Brazil

Grammy-winning artist Seu Jorge has come a very long way for a guy who grew up in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro. The Drum catches up with the Nike brand ambassador backstage in Portland to talk Bowie, Brazil and getting kids active.

Portland embraced Seu Jorge like one of its own this past fall, the city’s quirky nature making certain slightly bizarre moments not seem at all out of place – such as when members of the audience showed up dressed as the crew of the Belafonte from The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou.

Clad in light blue duds and red beanies, it was an outfit reserved for a very special show by Brazilian actor-musician Seu Jorge – The Life Aquatic: A Tribute to David Bowie.

Jorge recorded the Life Aquatic Studio Sessions in 2005; all covers of Bowie songs in Portuguese, sung in Jorge’s engaging smoky baritone. Like on the record, in the film and on stage, it was the simple beauty of artist, a guitar and the works of Bowie.

Wildly popular in his native Brazil, Jorge was skillfully cast as singing crew member Pelé dos Santos by director Wes Anderson for the film after seeing his turn as Knockout Ned in the powerful City of God, a critically-acclaimed 2002 film set in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro.

Seu Jorge Life Aquatic
Seu Jorge features predominantly in Wes Anderson’s The Life Aquatic singing David Bowie in Portuguese
 
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In The Life Aquatic, Anderson played to Jorge’s strengths, despite the fact he was cast with no audition and didn’t speak English at the time. Anderson put a great deal of faith in Jorge to realize the vision of Bowie’s songs being performed in Portuguese.

In Portland and other lucky cities around the country, crowds were enthralled by Jorge who, like Bowie, casts a larger-than life figure. On stage, the two-time Latin Grammy winner for Best Portuguese Language Contemporary Pop Album shared interesting and humorous stories about his time on set as clips on screen peppered the performance, but clearly, his love and appreciation for the gifts Bowie gave him was undeniable. In fact, the late music legend, who was nominated posthumously for four Grammy awards, said of Jorge’s work: ”Had Seu Jorge not recorded my songs in Portuguese, I would never have heard this new level of beauty which he has imbued them with.”

The tour was all about appreciation and admiration. “What I learned in this process is how timeless his music is,” says Jorge.

Jorge’s tour highlights a run of several years that has seen his star continue to rise, becoming an envoy of Bowie’s music. He was inspired to tour after the musician’s death, which was followed by his father’s death three days later.

He has also been an advocate for his city and country, before, during and beyond the Olympics. As a fan of running, Nike took notice and made Jorge one of the brand’s ambassadors and engaged him in the brand’s ‘Olympic Villages’ initiative.

From favela to fame

But the run up to fame and the Olympics started in the steep hillsides of Rio, where the downtrodden favelas loom over a city that still doesn’t know how to deal with them. Those neighborhoods are where Jorge grew up, and he still has a great love for the people and the shanty towns that marked his youth, even if they were tough.

Born Jorge Mario da Silva (Seu Jorge is a nickname given to him by a musician friend), he was raised in a favela near Rio. Jorge began working at age 10, fixing car tires, in part to escape the favela violence – his 16-year-old brother was killed in one of the frequent battles between police and favela drug gangs. He also frequented dances and began singing early.

Jorge left home at 19 and was homeless for a few years before finding theater and music as an outlet – both his father and grandfather were musicians. His early influences were the ever-present Brazilian sambas, along with artists like Al Green, Marvin Gaye, Frank Sinatra, Stevie Wonder, Bowie and Michael Jackson, his first idol.

Through an audition for Paulo Moura, a clarinetist, a musical path was laid in front of him. He began appearing in plays for Rio’s state university’s theater program, then released his first solo album, Samba Esporte Fino. In 2001, and in 2003 and 2004, he won the Paulista Association of Art Critics award for best singer of the year. Since then he has received numerous awards and accolades for his work on screen and on stage, and sang at the closing ceremony of the 2012 London Olympic Games.

Combining sports and music to lift up a community

Sport has always been important to Jorge. He played soccer growing up and still plays. When the Summer Olympic Games came to Rio, it gave Brazilians a deep sense of pride and community. Despite the issues facing the country and, indeed, those running up to the games, Jorge firmly believes that the Olympics moment in Brazil ran counter to expectations.

“It was a huge success and we are proud of it,” he says. “We proved to the world that it was possible to do this large-scale event and welcome the world to our country.”

Seu Jorge was a brand ambassador for Nike during the Rio games
 
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Not far from the venues where world-class athletes competed, another investment in Rio – and specifically, the favelas – was being realized. During the games Nike unveiled an important project for the country’s youth: the ‘Olympic Villages’ project revitalized 22 community sports and recreation centers in the city’s more under-represented areas.

“The Olympic Villages are so positive for us and it’s a good investment for Brazil,” notes Jorge. “It represents so much for the future and legacy after the Olympic Games.”

Obesity and inactivity are continual problems in Brazil. According to the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, Brazilian kids are the least active in Latin America.

The goal of the Olympic Villages revitalization is to improve access to sports and physical activity from 25,000 today up to 50,000 kids over five years. It also includes training for educators on physical activity and Nike will provide 40,000 pieces of product and equipment for the program each year over the next five years.

“We know sport changes lives and we understand the importance of providing safe places for kids to be active and social,” said Nike chief executive Mark Parker on a visit to one of the villages in Rio last summer. “These Olympic Villages are the heartbeat of that effort here – where kids can experience truly transformative experiences.”

Jorge agrees, saying: “Favelas, in my opinion, don’t need to exist, but now these kids are involved in sports, are getting an education and building great relationships. Brazilian kids deserve this. Nike making this investment means so much to us. It’s human investment in people’s talent – their expression. It could be soccer, running, it could be music.”

Running to inspire others

Running is something that Jorge has come to enjoy recently. Noting, on stage, that it was mainly due to an increased girth of his own, Nike provided both product and training around two years ago. “I completely fell in love with running,” he enthuses. “I want to someday run marathons around the world.”

What started as exercise has evolved into a ritual, where Jorge, whenever possible, runs to his shows. Crossing the Golden Gate Bridge, mixing with the locals in Venice and Malibu, California, and taking in the energy of Central Park are just a few of the runs – to his shows – that are favorites.

One tour, however, stands above the others. Celebrating the 10th anniversary of his collaboration with Brazilian singer Ana Carolina, the duo performed two shows in Rio and Jorge vowed to run 20km, to the show and back, each day.

“When I arrived she couldn’t believe that I ran the 10km to the show. She thought I wouldn’t be able to sing. Running makes my voice better, especially if I run before I sing. For me, it’s perfect. My lungs are open, my voice is clean, it’s awesome.”

Jorge has experienced great fame and is grateful for it, which is why he gives back through music, through running and through a sense that, even though things are still challenging in Brazil, he might just be able to help change them.

 

This feature first appeared in a special music issue of The Drum, published in partnership with the Grammys and Clio Music. You can subscribe to The Drum magazine here.

Virtual and Augmented Reality Investment Hit Record $2.3 Billion in 2016 (Guest Blog)

“Virtual reality will be big, augmented reality will be bigger and take longer” has become accepted wisdom. But now that we have 12 months of real-world performance since the VR/AR market launched last year, it’s time to do a reality check on VC and corporate investors.

VCs told us last year how they were to going to invest in VR/AR. Let’s see if they put their money where their mouths were.

Investment augmented

Digi-Capital’s new Augmented/Virtual Reality Report and deals database recorded VCs and corporate investors pouring $2.3 billion into VR/AR startups last year, or over three times the $700 million-plus invested in 2015. Three-hundred percent investment growth in 12 months is impressive in any sector, let alone such an early stage market.

Also Read: You Can’t Escape Wesley Snipes in New Virtual-Reality Short ‘The Recall VR Abduction’

Leap of faith

AR hardware player Magic Leap raised $793.5 million at a $4.5 billion valuation at the start of last year, and almost as much speculation about its tech at the end of it. But even though it has taken in more money than any other single company in the space, last year it accounted for only around $3 of every $10 invested in VR/AR. But add rounds from competing AR hardware players ODG ($58 million) and Meta ($50 million), and AR hardware took closer to $4 of every $10 invested. So the future looks augmented.

Also Read: After Mixed Year, Mobile AR to Drive $108 Billion VR/AR Market by 2021 (Guest Blog)

Virtual picks and shovels

The next largest sector was VR/AR services/solutions, which took just under $2 of every $10 invested. The largest investment here was in graphics engine Unity, with its $181 million monster round at a $1.5 billion valuation. Neural VR platform maker Mindmaze also became a VR unicorn when it raised $100 million at a $1 billion valuation. So VR/AR picks and shovels were a pretty attractive space for investors last year.

It’s video, Jim, but not as we know it

Even though experts will tell you that 360 video isn’t volumetric VR video (and why they think you should care either way), that didn’t stop investors from giving VR video companies over $1 of every $10 invested. NextVR raised $80 million, 360fly $40 million, and Baobab Studios’ wonderful bunny gobbled up a $25 million carrot.

Everyone else

And that’s not all, folks. VR hardware startups raised nearly $200 million despite the presence of Facebook, Samsung, Google and others, and both VR/AR peripherals and VR games sectors raised over $100 million each. Perhaps even more surprising was that VR/AR app developers (outside games) and VR/AR advertising/marketing startups each raised only around $80 million. They’re going to be huge drivers of long-term value, but it looks like investor thinking is still evolving as the market develops beyond its earliest stages.

Also Read: How Virtual Reality Filmmakers Used Brands to Develop a New Skill Set

On the money

So who’s behind all the red envelopes?

The big money came from the big boys: Alibaba, Warner Bros, Google, Qualcomm, Fidelity, J.P. Morgan, Morgan Stanley, T.Rowe Price, Wellington, CIC, Intel, Amazon, Fidelity, CITIC, NetEase, Softbank, 21st Century Fox, MGM, Lenovo, Tencent, Comcast, Samsung, HTC – it’s a greatest hits of the best investors in tech globally.

And they weren’t alone, as Sand Hill Road VCs including Sequoia, DFJ, Lightspeed, KPCB and Greylock entered the market, joining dedicated VR/AR funds Colopl Next, The VR Fund, Super Ventures, Signia Ventures, Maven Ventures, Presence Capital, GREE VR Capital, Boost VC, Anorak Ventures, Outpost Capital, B Capital and others. Not to mention all the angel investment in the space.

Also Read: You Can Watch Super Bowl Highlights in Virtual Reality This Year

What next?

That difficult second album can be a bear, so it’s going to be interesting to see how VC and corporate investors respond this year in the light of 2016’s mixed year for performance and VR/AR’s new trajectory driven by mobile AR. But no matter what happens in the short term, the long term looks bright for VR/AR investors and the startups they’re fueling.

You can find out more here.

(Methodology note: Digi-Capital’s deals database covers AR/VR pureplay startup fundraising, companies raising rounds specifically earmarked for their AR/VR divisions (even though they might do other things as well), and all the major American, Asian and European markets. Rounds raised for non-AR/VR purposes by companies that do other things are excluded. Categories included are: AR HMD (hardware), AR/VR Solutions/Services, VR Video, VR HMD (hardware), AR/VR Peripherals (hardware), AR/VR Games, AR/VR Applications (non-games), AR/VR Advertising/Marketing, AR/VR Tech (hardware and software) and AR/VR Distribution.)

Related stories from TheWrap:

You Can’t Escape Wesley Snipes in New Virtual-Reality Short ‘The Recall VR Abduction’

Augmented Reality Will Be Much Bigger than Virtual Reality, Study Says

7 Signs Augmented and Virtual Reality Are Ready for the Masses in 2017

Grammy Parties 2017: The Most Sought After Invites (Updating)

Leave your tuxedo in the garment bag.

Only outsiders (and Mark Burnett) bust out bowties and cummerbunds for Grammy parties. What intimacy the Grammy show experience sacrifices within the cavernous Staples Center, it makes up for with several nights of festivities that, unlike the formality of music’s TV and film peers, are actually fun.

Enjoy it while you can, L.A. Next year the Grammys are reportedly heading back to New York.

Here are the Party Report’s top invites for the Grammys 2017 before and after the telecast on Sunday, Feb. 12.

Thursday, Feb. 9

Thursday night sees the heaviest competition with multiple marquee events.

The Chainsmokers, Maren Morris
Spotify Celebrates the Best New Artist Nominees
Belasco Theater in Downtown L.A., 7:30 p.m.

In contrast to the industry’s lazy bookings for Super Bowl events — beginning with “Who will do it?” and ending up with Nelly and a condiment company sponsorship — this is an organic and natural match.

The Chainsmokers and Spotify’s symbiotic relationship over the last year propelled both sides to a massive win-win. Drew Taggart and Alex Pall (“Roses,” “Closer,” “All We Know,” “Paris,”) rank number three in the world on the leading streaming service, with 37 million streams a month. With these results came a three-year exclusive residency at Wynn nightlife properties in Las Vegas, record setting crowds at Coachella in April 2016, Billboard magazine covers, cross-country shows in the same day, and an epic end-of-year homecoming victory lap in L.A. (See below).

In addition, anchoring their own corner on Spotify, the “nice hair” duo are the apotheosis of multi-format crossovers, something Spotify seized on by splashing their faces on cover-art for numerous Spotify owned-and-operated playlists ranging from pure thump (electroNOW) to ones your mom listens to while running errands (dance pop X-Overs).

Don’t blame Spotify for slugging them with the misnomer of “Best New Artist.” Years after they collaborated with Tiësto on “Split (Only U)” and escaped the goofy stink of novelty hit “#Selfie,” the Grammys relegated them to the “New Artist” junior varsity. Their company is A+: the surging Kelsea Ballerini, independent force Chance the Rapper, Anderson .Paak (the one true fresh face from 2016), and fellow Spotify honoree, Maren Morris. Nona Entertainment’s DJ Alex Merrell will spin between performances.

Remember, Spotify is a data company. They know what you like.

Halsey
Delta’s Grammy Party – Official Grammy Event
Location withheld in Hollywood

A “Closer” performance has to be coming.

Drew Taggart and Halsey opening up Jewel Nightclub at the Aria last May. (Isaac Brekken/Getty Images for GREY GOOSE Vodka)

The Chainsmokers will play a few miles from downtown (see above) with an early 7:30 p.m. start time, with Halsey following at 9 p.m. Besides their high-profile live performances (like the VMAs in last summer), the boys and Halsey have linked up in more intimate settings. The “New Americana” singer jumped out of a VIP booth to join the Chains at the opening of Jewel Nightclub at the Aria in Las Vegas last May.

Celebrating 10 years as the Grammys’ official airline, Delta’s salute to “first time nominees” dovetails nicely with Halsey. She’s hot right now with a song for the new “Fifty Shades Darker,” with early screenings beginning down the block at the Arclight at the same time this bash gets underway.

The other big story here, though, is the location. This is a debutante party for a major new hospitality block in Hollywood that has not yet flipped the switch to “open.”

Erykah Badu
ESSENCE Black Women In Music – Official Grammy Event
NeueHouse, 8 p.m

The 8th annual event pays tribute to the “On & On” singer on the 20th anniversary of her arrival on the music scene. Back in 1997, Badu had two albums go platinum in her debut year, selling over five million copies total. An official Grammys week event, Lincoln and Absolut join the Recording Academy for this party at NeueHouse, an emerging player on awards weekend. Tiwa Savage will perform with Badu.

Whole Planet Foundation
OHM Nightclub (6801 Hollywood Blvd.)

Whole Foods’ charitable foundation works around the world doling out micro-loans to self-employed farmers and poor communities that grow and produce the food sold on their shelves. This event honors a group that has funded 4,463 births, planted 57,575 trees, and donated 7,482 bicycles while building 10 schools and offering supplies to over 32,000 students. Katey Sagal, Kris Kristofferson and Chris Assaad perform.

Friday, February 10

Tom Petty: 2017 MusiCares Person of the Year – Official Grammy Event
L.A. Convention Center, 5:30 p.m.

Each year, MusiCares continues to astound with one-of-a-kind performances. This year, Stevie Nicks, Gary Clark Jr., Foo Fighters, Kings of Leon, The Bangles, Don Henley, Jackson Browne, George Strait and more will each perform a cover of their favorite Petty hit before joining the rocker on stage for a massive jam session to close the night.

The dinner, auction and show benefits the Grammys’ official charity, MusiCares. It provides a safety net for unknown musicians by providing emergency financial assistance for basic living expenses, medical emergencies, sober touring networks and addiction and recovery services.

A “top tier” industry event, some $75,000 front row donor tables are available this year for the first time. That’s you plus ten friends who each have loose change and an open Friday night.

Saturday, February 11

UMG Artist Showcase
The Theatre at the Ace Hotel, 12:30 -3:30 p.m.

Universal Music Group hosts their annual Artist Showcase on the Saturday of Grammys weekend, presented by Citi and American Airlines. While the performances are a surprise, past artists who have performed at the UMG showcase include Demi Lovato, DNCE, The Weeknd, Sam Smith, Keith Urban, Ariana Grande and Lorde.

*Mystery Stars Kept Under Wraps*
Clive Davis Party
The Beverly Hilton

Clive never reveals who will perform at the party in advance. It’s always a surprise for the audience, themselves all big names crammed into a small room.

In recent years, Pharrell Williams, Afrojack, Kelly Clarkson, Miley Cyrus, Jennifer Hudson, Barry Manilow, Robin Thicke and Lionel Richie have taken the stage. Davis actually hosts, as in, he gets on the microphone and extols artists and gives shout outs to the famous faces in the room. It’s the most exciting Bar Mitzvah bash you’ve been to since seventh grade.

Anderson .Paak & the Free Nationals, DJ set by Kaytranada
Soho Sounds: LA
Downtown L.A., 9 p.m.

Soho House launches a new pop-up music series with this event. While named “LA,” the future editions will not be restricted to our fair city. Kudos to the membership club for bringing their trademark sense of taste and discretion to cull a legitimate, relevant and in-demand Anderson .Paak to kick it for Soho members and a few select music industry friends. Bacardi will provide the pours. BMW is shuttling people downtown, something SoHo members may be getting used to soon with a new location coming in the 213 at some point. For Kaytranada, see him here now or at Coachella in April.

Maren Morris, Preservation Hall Jazz Band and DJ Michelle Pesce
Nielsen’s Party
Nightingale Plaza (West Hollywood), 8 p.m.

Maren Morris will be everywhere this Grammys weekend. Like Miguel or Andra Day in years past, after non-stop exposure to the industry over a few days, she won’t require a Google after Feb. 12. Before Preservation Hall gigs at Coachella (sweet move, manager Greg Lucas), check them in West Hollywood here.

For Pesce, she returns to the booth that she christened. On Emmys weekend last fall, Donald Glover supervised a Pesce-generated dance circle at Entertainment Weekly’s party here, which was the first gathering ever at the La Cienega Blvd. nightclub.

Grammy Night: Sunday, February 12

Chance the Rapper
GQ
Chateau Marmont

GQ’s Jim Nelson and Jim Moore have already won big Grammy night: partnering with DIY superstar rapper Chance the Rapper to celebrate after the show. Chance has seven nominations, including three of the five noms for “Best Rap Song.” Appropriately, Youtube is co-hosting the bash for the guy who made history in 2016 for charting the first ever “streams only” album, meaning, there was no plan to sell albums, only to stream. It worked.

With their dense “Men of the Year” celebration lighting up the Chateau each December, the men’s style guide should feel right at home.

Universal Music Group Grammy After Party
The Theatre at the Ace Hotel

Universal returns to the Ace Hotel for a bash that will go into the night. Shawn Mendes, the “Kaceys” (Kacy Hill and Kacey Musgraves), Hailee Steinfeld, Russell Simmons, Joe Jonas and Zendaya all partied here last Grammy night. Crossing corporate fiefdoms, even CBS chief Les Moonves made this his party preference after the Grammys signed off. American Airlines and Citi continue their partnership with Universal for this party, as well.

Gallant, Kehlani and Spencer Ludwig
Warner Music Group Grammy Party
Milk Studios, 9 p.m.

Unlike last year’s throwback performer Missy Elliott, these three headliners are super relevant right now.

Kehlani’s album “SweetSexySavage” arrived last Friday (Jan. 27), an occasion to open up to the L.A. Times about being a “young black, Spanish, Native American, queer [woman] … all things that have been attacked (in the new Trump administration).” A Coachella date and a world tour will follow, but after the Grammys catch her at Milk with the Warners crew.

Win or lose, Warner throws a good party. We don’t understand why other industry players don’t choose Milk Studios for more awards show after parties, as it is engineered for both cocktails and performances. It sits empty on Oscar, Emmy and most other awards show nights except the night before the ESPYs, when a dude-heavy ESPN crowd turns it in to a glitzy Hollywood locker room.

All events are private and by invitation only.

Please send invites and updates to the party columnist Mikey Glazer here.

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Grammys 2017: Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ Leads With 9 Nominations

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